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Thread: How to train a dog to Leave it

  1. #1

    Default How to train a dog to Leave it

    training a dog to the "leave it" command can be discussed here.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jakarta - Indonesia
    Posts
    5

    Default Leave it...

    Mike... could really use the tips and pointers here! My dogs are very UNFAMILIAR with leaving things alone! What is the key concept Mike?

    Also... do you know how to make your dog stop barking when they're tied up?

  3. #3

    Default Teaching "Leave It" command

    Hey Eric,

    I'll be posting video in the near future on this one. It is going to follow the same chain reaction of commands as the other commands such as sit. down, etc. We will counter the "leave it" with the word "OK". Ultimately "leave it" will mean to disengage with object or person, dog, etc. and "OK" will mean it is now OK to engage. I have some footage on this but I am going to post more soon.

    About the barking when tied up... What is the situation? Is the barking directed at you to untie him or is the barking directed at passerbys, strangers, etc?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jakarta - Indonesia
    Posts
    5

    Thumbs up barking

    at me, to untie mike... I know it's not the best situation... but I have to tie him up every now and then when having visitors over. So, he would bark and bark for a while until he calms down or until I untie him...

    As you know, pitbulls do not bark at people but other animals for sure. Same case with my boy Taro.

    I have posted a "Before" video of my pitbull in my site mike and will upload the "After" learning from your videos soon! You'll be amazed... my dogs are magically transformed! Thanks to you Mike! The videos help a lot....wonderful stuff.

  5. #5

    Default barking on the tie out.

    Hey Eric,

    You can have a double problem there.

    First, you can have a traditional seperation anxiety problem going on if the dog is not used to being seperated in this way from you.

    Second, the problem can be made harder if the dog feels vulnerable because he is tied.

    You can fix half the problem if you had the option of putting the dog in a more open fenced in area or seperate room in the house, maybe even a crate if indoors and not out in the open.

    If not an option or even if you do use one of these options, you may have to work on traditional seperation anxiety issues by following your standard leadership exercises (step 5 on the triangle) and following your step 8 (seperation anxiety drills). Get him used to wear ever you plan on seperated him on a daily basis for shorter durations and make it as positive as possible for him. Maybe feed him out there or give him a special treat that lasts a while only when he is in that place. Try to bring him back to you before he gets all worked up. Set him up for success and make the duration a little longer each time. This can take patience. Definitely make sure he is not all over you when you are physically with him. since seperation when you are not present is easier for the dog when he can deal with seperation first when you are physically available.

    I hope this helps to start.

    Thanks for the compliments on the site and vids. More to come. Just posted first phase 3 vid also a new protection video will be up by late tonight (my time).

    I want to PM you soon to write about a few things. I'll be in contact soon!

    Sorry disappeared for a while. just finished a move and was out internet. Ready to roll again! Can't wait to see your vid when ready!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jakarta - Indonesia
    Posts
    5

    Thumbs up As Advised!

    Well Mike,
    I think I figured out the answered before I read your reply below!
    So, yes... you're spot on! I built a large cage for Taro and Lady, and they seem to be calmer. Only the separation drill is needed to be exercersised immediately now! They're ALL OVER me when I arrive from work!

    Again, thank you for your advices Mike! Wonderful stuff here... I'll be uploading my result VIDEO today for you to see! Now, this is as a result of your training method! Check out the result!

    Did you PM me?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jakarta - Indonesia
    Posts
    5

    Lightbulb

    Well Mike, here it is.... the first one... Taro, a Pit Bull.
    Came knowing nothing as far as trained behavior goes...so wild and rowdy to start!

    Now, listens quite well... although still need to smooth it out a bit, longer consistency as you mentioned. 33 days!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yF_dsrYwg3g

    I will be posting up the BEFORE video too soon. Btw just to proof to you guys here that it works, I use my own tribal (not native Indonesian even) language for this FREE instruction!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike D'Abruzzo View Post
    Hey Eric,

    You can have a double problem there.

    First, you can have a traditional seperation anxiety problem going on if the dog is not used to being seperated in this way from you.

    Second, the problem can be made harder if the dog feels vulnerable because he is tied.

    You can fix half the problem if you had the option of putting the dog in a more open fenced in area or seperate room in the house, maybe even a crate if indoors and not out in the open.

    If not an option or even if you do use one of these options, you may have to work on traditional seperation anxiety issues by following your standard leadership exercises (step 5 on the triangle) and following your step 8 (seperation anxiety drills). Get him used to wear ever you plan on seperated him on a daily basis for shorter durations and make it as positive as possible for him. Maybe feed him out there or give him a special treat that lasts a while only when he is in that place. Try to bring him back to you before he gets all worked up. Set him up for success and make the duration a little longer each time. This can take patience. Definitely make sure he is not all over you when you are physically with him. since seperation when you are not present is easier for the dog when he can deal with seperation first when you are physically available.

    I hope this helps to start.

    Thanks for the compliments on the site and vids. More to come. Just posted first phase 3 vid also a new protection video will be up by late tonight (my time).

    I want to PM you soon to write about a few things. I'll be in contact soon!

    Sorry disappeared for a while. just finished a move and was out internet. Ready to roll again! Can't wait to see your vid when ready!
    #1 Indonesia's Dog Training Expert
    You Are The Dog!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Jakarta - Indonesia
    Posts
    5

    Talking and sit

    And a Successfull SIT instruction in my tribal language too!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAT0c-ovXbw

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike D'Abruzzo View Post
    Hey Eric,

    You can have a double problem there.

    First, you can have a traditional seperation anxiety problem going on if the dog is not used to being seperated in this way from you.

    Second, the problem can be made harder if the dog feels vulnerable because he is tied.

    You can fix half the problem if you had the option of putting the dog in a more open fenced in area or seperate room in the house, maybe even a crate if indoors and not out in the open.

    If not an option or even if you do use one of these options, you may have to work on traditional seperation anxiety issues by following your standard leadership exercises (step 5 on the triangle) and following your step 8 (seperation anxiety drills). Get him used to wear ever you plan on seperated him on a daily basis for shorter durations and make it as positive as possible for him. Maybe feed him out there or give him a special treat that lasts a while only when he is in that place. Try to bring him back to you before he gets all worked up. Set him up for success and make the duration a little longer each time. This can take patience. Definitely make sure he is not all over you when you are physically with him. since seperation when you are not present is easier for the dog when he can deal with seperation first when you are physically available.

    I hope this helps to start.

    Thanks for the compliments on the site and vids. More to come. Just posted first phase 3 vid also a new protection video will be up by late tonight (my time).

    I want to PM you soon to write about a few things. I'll be in contact soon!

    Sorry disappeared for a while. just finished a move and was out internet. Ready to roll again! Can't wait to see your vid when ready!
    #1 Indonesia's Dog Training Expert
    You Are The Dog!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Wappingers Falls, NY
    Posts
    27

    Default Leave It

    Hi Mike,

    Stitch pretty much knows "leave it". Unfortunately, he doesn't always want to. Two of the hardest times for us is when he is using the spring pole and when we play with his whip (actual whip w/furry thing on the end).

    He's especially uncooperative with the furry thing on the whip .... he "leaves it" but when I go to pick it up he grabs it again. HAHA! Gotchya!

    Is the answer as simple as -- we need to practice more in formal training sessions?

  10. #10

    Default Teaching the "Leave it"

    Yes, basically comes down to teaching the "leave it" formally. I DO have to put good fottage up on this, but it does follow the same basic principals as everything else. Stitch may know what "leave it" means, but not necessarily that he has to do it, or was taught any formal responsibility behind the command.

    This can be equated with a dog that knows what come means, but will only do it if there is something in it for him, or has nothing better to do.

    A good "leave it" involves all three phases of training, which will teach the dog what it means, how the rules apply to it, and drills which will reinforce that there is no way around it until it becomes a habit.

    I promise this is on the agenda for the vids.

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